A visit to Jingdezhen with Bo Gyllensvärd
4-24 September 1992

An invitation and journey to study the recent findings from the excavations of the Imperial Ming Kilns
at Zhushan, and other aspects of the ceramic history of China in and around the city of Jingdezhen.
Text and photo © Jan-Erik Nilsson 1992

Wednesday 16 September 1992
The Porcelain Exhibition Hall, again

The afternoon was spent at The Porcelain Exhibition Hall.

Discussion at the Porcelain Exhibition Hall

Discussion at the Porcelain Exhibition Hall

We looked at and photographed the shards on the 3rd floor. This time we did not visited the museum exhibition on the first floor or the exhibition hall on the second floor.

Exhibition Hall meeting with Bo

This time Bo was able to join in. This is actually the occasion when I took the pictures that are added in on the previous page.
Show case 4. Hongzhi (1488-1505) in the background.

Porcelain hall manager

Porcelain Hall manager

We were offered a lot of tea I think out of concern for Bo. Bo spoke some and the Chinese expressed their willingness to exhibit minyao in Sweden.

As a related thought I think it is time to exhibit contemporary Chinese studio ceramics in Sweden.

Their manufacturing department was very small; it was limited to a corner of the back yard. Painting and decorating takes a lot longer than the turning of the body.

Bowls

Bowls drying in the shade.

Bowls drying

Same bowls, from the inside of the pavilion.

Porcelain drying racks

A variety of porcelain pieces drying in the shade. On the small bowls we can see that the bases and footrims are made in a different manner here, than at the 'Ancient Porcelain Factory'. The stub handle is here well inside the foot rim.

Shaving down to size

Shaving off excess clay from the base and carefully shaping the foot rim.

censers

The censers are carefully having their ears and lid decoration added, that are cast somewhere else and have now dried enough to be added onto the main body.

Decorating a bowl

Underglaze blue decoration added to a bowl

Jar

The red color on the unfired jar is tracing color that is used to create an imprint on the porcelain body that could be followed when drawing the final decoration with cobalt. As could be seen from the model on the table, the cobalt will be drawn in several most carefully calculated shades.

Juhuchun Pear shaped vase

Pear shaped vases decorated with cobalt, waiting to be glazed.

Text and photos on this web page are copyright as published © Jan-Erik Nilsson, Gotheborg.com, Sweden 2014